Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

can I do it on my own

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    can I do it on my own

    I drink too much, it is obvious and I now that I have to quit for my health. I can easily drink 12 ounces of rum in a day. I live alone, I am retired, and as I work and do what has to be done at home it seems that I always have a rum and ginger at my side. I was recently in a hospital for 10 days with a non-related illness, obviously no alcohol was served, and I didn't notice any alcohol related withdrawl symptoms, however as soon as I got home I had a drink in my hand. Also a year ago I decided to quit smoking and I did, cold turkey, it drove me mad for a week or two, but I have not had a cigarette since then. So I think that if I try hard enough I can show some will power and hopefully succeed in going dry. I have read that quitting drinking, expecially with the volume that I am accustomed to could be dangerous for my health if I choose to do it on my own at home, (that is my plan) the implication was that I should have medical supervision. Considering everything should I try to quit drinking on my own?

    I just joined this forum today so I don't know if this question is appropriate, I hope that it is because it is meant in all seriousness.



    #2
    Hi Mike,
    This is my first post. I felt compelled to write as I started the beer reduction today. Day one. I usually drink wine or bourbon at this time of night so I feel myself weakening. But I decided I have to try and reach out if I feel I am weakening. I am in your corner! I just want to give my liver and kidneys a break.
    Sue

    Comment


      #3
      Hi! You should definitely taper or get medical help. There is helpful information on the main page that you can use to set it up. I drank every day for almost 4 years, 8-10 drinks a night and I just successfully tapered to zero two days ago. You can do it! It’s not fun and there is some pain involved (mentally and physically) but it is doable.

      I highly suggest posting on the closed forum so you can get answers to your specific questions and the support to help you through it.

      Comment


        #4
        The answer is - maybe.

        It's like this, you either can or you can't.

        Here's how you go about it. Don't drink for 30 days. Dump all the booze, and commit to 30 days - no matter what.

        One of two things will happen.

        You will either say "hey, that's a great idea, I can do that" and you will

        or

        You'll change your mind some days into it. It could sound something like this in your head. "I just went 15 days without alcohol, that's awesome, I'm doing great. It's Friday night, a couple won't hurt. I'll just have a couple tonight, and then finish out the month without alcohol." Which you may, or may not do. It might not be but 3 days.. or 4 days.. This is the baffling nature of alcohol.. it has a tendency to "change your mind".. it's subtle.

        To me, that thinking snowballed. I would go 4 days without drinking, then drink, then the next period would be less... say 2 days, then drink, then 1 day, then drinking every day again until I tried again, 5 days, drink, 3 days, drink drink drink. I couldn't possibly make 30 days. I spent YEARS waking up saying "I won't drink today, no way no how! But then find myself at the liquor store that afternoon.

        If the idea of 30 days sounds absolutely nuts to you, you might want to perk up and pay attention to that.

        I would advise against comparing cigarettes to alcohol. It seems like will power would work for both, but that's not the case. If will power was all it took to quit drinking, every abnormal drinker would be sober today, AA rooms would be empty, and out patient services would be out of business. The truth is for certain class of drinker, no amount of will power alone is sufficient.

        Consequently, when I did stop drinking there was no tapering. Tapering in my case simply led to more drinking. Maybe it works for some people, but I wasn't one of them.

        2 and half decades and then some of daily heavy drinking, today I'm 405 days sober. And no, I didn't do it alone.

        Attempting to overcome alcoholism and failing is a highly demoralizing set of events. There are people out there who have been exactly where you are and have overcome. Your situation is not just you. There are many thousands and thousands The answer is - maybe.

        It's like this, you either can or you can't.

        Here's how you go about it. Don't drink for 30 days. Dump all the booze, and commit to 30 days - no matter what.

        One of two things will happen.

        You will either say "hey, that's a great idea, I can do that" and you will

        or

        You'll change your mind some days into it. It could sound something like this in your head. "I just went 15 days without alcohol, that's awesome, I'm doing great. It's Friday night, a couple won't hurt. I'll just have a couple tonight, and then finish out the month without alcohol." Which you may, or may not do. It might not be but 3 days.. or 4 days.. This is the baffling nature of alcohol.. it has a tendency to "change your mind".. it's subtle.

        To me, that thinking snowballed. I would go 4 days without drinking, then drink, then the next period would be less... say 2 days, then drink, then 1 day, then drinking every day again until I tried again, 5 days, drink, 3 days, drink drink drink. I couldn't possibly make 30 days. I spent YEARS waking up saying "I won't drink today, no way no how! But then find myself at the liquor store that afternoon.

        If the idea of 30 days sounds absolutely nuts to you, you might want to perk up and pay attention to that.

        I would advise against comparing cigarettes to alcohol. It seems like will power would work for both, but that's not the case. If will power was all it took to quit drinking, every abnormal drinker would be sober today, AA rooms would be empty, and out patient services would be out of business. The truth is for certain class of drinker, no amount of will power alone is sufficient.

        Consequently, when I did stop drinking there was no tapering. Tapering in my case simply led to more drinking. Maybe it works for some people, but I wasn't one of them.

        2 and half decades of daily heavy drinking, today I'm 405 days sober. And no, I didn't do it alone.

        Attempting to overcome alcoholism and failing is a highly demoralizing set of events. There are people out there who have been exactly where you are and have overcome. You're situation is not just you. There are many thousands and thousands, dare I say millions, of people whose commentary would be just like yours. You're not unique, and I found comfort in discovering this.
        My Drinking Story

        Comment

        Working...
        X